School of Conflict Management, Peacebuilding and Development

Resources / Course Descriptions

Descriptions of courses offered by the School of Conflict Management, Peacebuilding and Development are listed below. While every effort has been made to keep this list as current and up-to-date as possible, please consult your student handbook for the most current descriptions.


NOTE: Course credits given in the following format "0-0-0" translate to:
class hours - lab hours - total credits

International Conflict Management (INCM)

  • INCM 9001 - Theories and Analysis in International Conflict Management

    • This course focuses on the theories and research in the international arena through which to analyze conflicts. These include, but are not limited to, culture, gender, economics, ethnicity, race, history, geography, resources, and religion. Students examine the emergence of the Conflict Management field, as well as the historical perspectives and current theories in the field of Conflict Management. This course provides an overview of the terminology of the field as well as various perspectives for studying the continuum of war and peace-making. Students will examine the paradigms and worldviews through which parties view conflict and consider the possible outcomes based on those paradigms and evaluate Conflict Management methodologies for conducting research based on various paradigms, worldviews, and conflict situations. Students will have the opportunity to select an area of particular interest and examine current resarch and practices in that realm.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to the Ph.D. program.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • INCM 9002 - International Relations: Theory, System, and Practice

    • This course examines the major concepts, theoretical approaches, and dilemmas inherent to the study of international relations. In particular the course seeks to provide the basis for better understanding globalization and its consequence within the context of various policy sub-areas such as trade, human rights, migration, cross-border issues, and security. It also examines evolving attitudes toward the role of the state and sovereignty within a rapidly globalizing environment. What role does the international system have in shaping the global economy and ensuing interactions among states, transnational actors, and civil society? This seminar will focus on power, strategic bargaining, security, and other influences on international conflict management in order to answer this question.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to the Ph.D. program.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • INCM 9004 - Faculty Research Colloquium

    • This course serves to better familiarize the program students with the research interests of the faculty available to them as major professors and faculty mentors. This is where affiliated faculty would share their backgrounds and research interests.
    • Prerequisites: Prerequisite: Admission to the Ph.D. program.
    • Credits: 1-0-1
  • INCM 9005 - Economics of Conflict

    • This course examines the links between economics as a social science and the study of conflicts. Topics covered include: how real world conflicts have shaped economic paradigms, how real world economics has spurred or reduced conflict, and how economic methodology can help to understand conflict dynamics.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to the Ph.D. program.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • INCM 9006 - Intercultural Dynamics in International Conflict Management

    • This course examines the intercultural dynamics that influence the formation, implementation, and evaluation of international conflict management. This course focuses on cultural and identity formation; intercultural communication, negotiation, and dialogue; and the theories that inform this area of scholarship.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to the Ph.D. program.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • INCM 9101 - Fundamentals of Research Design

    • This course will focus on the fundamentals of scientific inquiry in areas of conflict including ethics of research, integrating cultural sensitivity in all stages of the research process, conceptualization and operationalization of research questions, data collection techniques, an introduction to qualitative and quantitative methods and measurement, a discussion of program evaluation research, and research proposal development.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to the Ph.D. program.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • INCM 9102 - Quantitative Methods

    • This course will focus on quantitative techniques including descriptive and inferential statistical analyses such as regression, correlation, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, and sampling techniques. Students will apply these techniques using statistical software packages.
    • Prerequisites: INCM 9101.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • INCM 9103 - Qualitative Methods

    • This course will focus on qualitative techniques including case study, participant observation, discourse analysis, in-depth interview, and sampling techniques. Students will apply these techniques using statistical software packages.
    • Prerequisites: INCM 9101.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • INCM 9210 - Advanced Quantitative Methods

    • This course focuses on the development of applied quantitative research skills using statistical analysis software packages. Topics covered include: structural equation modeling, path analysis, dummy-dependent variable estimation, non-linear regression, time-series analysis, and panel data.
    • Prerequisites: INCM 9102.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • INCM 9230 - Advanced Qualitative Methods

    • This course will cover advanced topics beyond those covered in INCM 9103, such as phenomenology, grounded theory, and content analysis. The lab component will involve projects interpreting and applying these techniques using software for qualitative analysis (e.g., NVIVO8) and/or practical field experience.
    • Prerequisites: INCM 9103.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • INCM 9250 - International Program and Management Evaluation

    • This course will focus on developing skills and knowledge for program analysis including causal effects of interventions and outcomes, instrument evaluation in international conflict management areas, cost effectiveness and cost-benefit analysis, quality control, risk assessment, and impact analysis.
    • Prerequisites: INCM 9102 and INCM 9103.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • INCM 9290 - Special Topics in Research Methods

    • This course covers topics in research methods that are of special interest to students, including survey design, geographic information system and spatial analysis, model building simulations, and interview design and implementation.
    • Prerequisites: INCM 9102 and INCM 9103.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • INCM 9320 - Essentials of International Negotiation: Theory and Practice

    • This course covers the theory and practice of international negotiation. It examines the practice of negotiation in actual international settings. Students will study historical negotiation processes through the use of archival material. The cross-cultural aspects of negotiation, the differences in worldview, and the ethical dimensions of the work are of particular importance to this body of knowledge. Active simulations where dialogue and deliberation can be practiced will be the hands-on part of the class work. The course contains a practicum in which a student can work on a practical project of her/his own choosing.
    • Prerequisites: NCM 9001 or INCM 9002.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • INCM 9330 - Foundations and Issues in International Political Economy

    • This seminar introduces students to the structure, institutions, and issues in international political economy. Particular attention is paid to global forces influencing trade and finance relations, distributive justice, and international agreements.
    • Prerequisites: INCM 9001 or INCM 9002.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • INCM 9340 - Transnational Civil Society and Conflict

    • This course familiarizes students with the theory and operation of transnational civil society (TCS). It introduces key theories of civil society campaign formation and influence, as well as questions about TCS legitimacy, representativeness, and agency. Students then apply these theories and address these questions by examining the impact of itnernational civil society on national politics in fragile, conflict, and post-conflict states.
    • Prerequisites: INCM 9001 or INCM 9002.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • INCM 9350 - Peacebuilding, Peacekeeping, and Reconciliation

    • This course provides an opportunity for the student to choose a historical conflict of particular interest to him/her and examine the case in-depth, as well as develop the methodological tools to analyze the case. The policies and logistics related to the various models of peacebuilding and peacekeeping, both civil and military, are studied along with the examination of both internal and external forces that drove the conflict. Various case studies, among others, could be examined based on the interest of and experience by the student; Northern Ireland, Colombia, Sudan, South Africa, Nicaragua, or Rwanda. Models and historical examples of forms of reconciliation and harmony building are studied based on the historical perspective of each one. The students will conclude with an analysis of comparative goals, strategies, assumptions, and possible outcomes among the three approaches to peace.
    • Prerequisites: INCM 9001 and INCM 9002.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • INCM 9360 - Gender, Conflict, Peace

    • Gender relations, long ignored as an important factor in conflict situations, are now acknowledged as a key factor shaping international conflicts. The obvious connection between gender and conflict is that they both entail subtle and intricate workings of power relationships that underlie our everyday existence. They influence each other in culturally specific ways in association with race, ethnicity, nationality, citizenship, sexuality and class. Decoding such intersections between gender and societal aspects of identity and power is crucial for understanding, comprehending and managing conflicts. Gender constructions guide the ways in which conflicts unfold and how peace is managed. Conflicts and related concerns also construct, confirm and change notions of gender. This interdisciplinary seminar will be an exciting platform to highlight state of the art debates, innovative methodologies and theoretical approaches in research on gender, security and peace building.
    • Prerequisites: INCM 9001 or INCM 9002
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • INCM 9370 - International Project Management

    • This course provides an opportunity for the student to obtain the fundamental skills related to international project management. Included in this skill set are examinations of working in corss-cultural contexts, working with diverse groups, and conflicts within and among international organizations. A substantial amount of time in this class is spent on developing the skills of grant writing, fundraising, project identification, design, monitoring, implementation techniques and evaluation research. This practicum-like team experience allows the students to envision an international project, and write a grant that could support and provide for an evaluation of the project.
    • Prerequisites: INCM 9001 or INCM 9002
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • INCM 9380 - Sustainable Development

    • This interdisciplinary course introduces students to major philosophical debates and policy interventions in the field of development and sustainability. It raises the questions about the political and cultural assumptions undergirding conventional ways of thinking about development, production, distribution, consumption and conflict. Through case studies and policy critiques students also learn the pros and cons of particular methodologies of studying and practicing sustainable development in peace time and during conflict.
    • Prerequisites: INCM 9001 or INCM 9002.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • INCM 9410 - Comparative Conflict Management Policies of International Organizations

    • This course focuses on the role of international and intra-national organizations and the impact of their Conflict Management policies. The role of the United Nations will be studied along with various regional and transnational organizations. Conflict Resolution strategies and processes for analysis within international organizations are examined along with the coherence of and within those policies. Students will examine organizations that include, but are not limited to, the following: United Nations Development Programme, United States Agency for International Development, United States Institute of Peace, North American Free Trade Agreement, the African Union, World Trade Organization, Canadian International Development Agency, World Bank, and the European Union. Particular emphasis is placed on the impact of the North/South divide.
    • Prerequisites: INCM 9001, INCM 9002, and INCM 9003.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • INCM 9430 - Post-Agreement Reconstruction

    • This course provides an opportunity to examine emerging research on the impact of peace agreements on the conflict process. Of particular interest will be the role for development economics, including programs to alleviate poverty like micro-credit, as well as the coruption of prospects for sustaining the ceasefire and building peace. External and internal influences are studied, such as donor fatigue, media attention, civic education, and the reintegration of participants of the conflict into civil society. Students will compare conflict mitigation processes and assess their effectiveness for the context in which they were utilized.
    • Prerequisites: INCM 9001 or INCM 9002.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • INCM 9450 - Current Conflicts

    • A selection of Special Topcis is offered on a rotating basis based on the interests of the students, the availability of program and visiting faculty, and current or emerging conflict issues. These topics might include, but are not limited to, the following: Disarmament, Reintegration and Demobilization; Health-related Conflict; Country Case Studies; Gender and Conflict Management; Identity and Conflict; Human Rights; Pre- and Post-conflict Processes of Deomcratization; Environmental Conflict; Internship with International Organization; Conflict Mitigation; Non-Governmental Organizations; International Non-Governmental Organizations; and Grassroots Organizing and Organizations.
    • Prerequisites: INCM 9101 and INCM 9102.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • INCM 9451 - Conflicts in Africa

    • This course investigates the origins, causes, resolution, and consequences of conflicts in contemporary Africa in light of their postcolonial contexts. Among others, it examines ethnic/clan, religious, political, and environmental conflict factors, demographic pressures on land and natural resources, discusses strategies for conflict resolution and post-conflict reconciliation and reconstruction, and evaluates the role of pan-continental and regional organizations, the United Nations and its agencies, Western powers and emerging Asian powers (especially China) in African conflicts.
    • Prerequisites: INCM 9001 or INCM 9002.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • INCM 9510 - Related Study of a Selected Regional Area

    • Each student is expected to have an overseas internship experience and will be writing on a dissertation topic on events in a certain part(s) of the world. We therefore require a Regional Course. The knowledge gained will help in the internship and dissertation writing experiences and will provide the student with a sense of identity within the program. The courses may be at the master's level and would thus be cross-listed for the Ph.D. program. The regional course may be taught from any number of disciplines (anthropology, communication, economics, geography, history, literatuere, political science, etc.). The type and number of regional courses would vary, but the following are examples: North America, Middle America (including Caribbean), South America, Europe, Russian Realm, North Africa/Southwest Asia (Middle East), Sub-Saharan Africa, East Asia, South Asia, Southeast Asia, or Pacific Realm.
    • Prerequisites: INCM 9001 or INCM 9002.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • INCM 9530 - Related Study of a Selected Topical Area

    • The philosophy of this course is to assist the student in acquiring foundational ideas for their dissertation. Suggested topical courses may include the following (or a combination thereof), depending on the affiliated faculty interests: Economics, Environmental Studies, Gender, Global Communication, International Development, Peace Studies, Public Health, or Religion. These course may also be team-taught.
    • Prerequisites: INCM 9001 or INCM 9002.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • INCM 9550 - Related Course Directed Study

    • Students are expected to take an additional three credit hours in related study coursework, choosing from a pool of courses (available electives, cross-listed courses, directed study, transfer courses) selected in agreement with the faculty advisor.
    • Prerequisites: INCM 9001 or INCM 9002.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • INCM 9600 - Dissertation Proposal Colloquium

    • This course will culminate in the formulation of theoretically significant, methodologically sound and policy relevant research questions, development of the dissertation prospectus, peer review of research proposals, and preparation of articles for presentation at conferences and publication.
    • Prerequisites: Approval of the advisor.
    • Credits: 1-0-1
  • INCM 9601 - Case Writing and Case Teaching

    • In this course, students are introduced to the case study methodology and learn how to design and use case studies effectively in their professional environments. Students develop their own idea for a case study on a topic of particular interest to them. The study includes a target audience, a compelling story, one or more identifiable case/policy decision dilemmas, teaching notes, and some ideas about the policy implications of the dilemmas presented in their case.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to the Ph.D. program.
    • Credits: 1-0-1
  • INCM 9602 - Peacebuilding Assessment

    • In this course students apply conflict management skills to the analysis of complex emergencies and international conflict using examples from the field of peacebuilding and post-conflict reconstruction. Through classroom discussion, exercises and role play, students develop policy recommendations and design and plan strategies for conflict prevention and/or intervention.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to the Ph.D. program.
    • Credits: 1-0-1
  • INCM 9603 - Essentials of Mediation

    • This course emphasizes listening, facilitation, and collaborative problem-solving skills within a third-party process of conflict intervention. As a future-oriented process of dialogue and negotiation, mediation is appropriate for many, but not all, disputes; this course concludes with a focus on the ethical dimensions of mediation practice. The fundamental skills and processes of mediation are valuable to any professional who regularly works with organizational colleagues or international counterparts.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to the Ph.D. program.
    • Credits: 1-0-1
  • INCM 9604 - Nonviolent Resistance

    • This course provides an overview of the different approaches to nonviolent resistance found in the literature (pragmatic vs. principled) and the theoretical concepts underlying the strategies and tactics used by scholars and nonviolent activists. In addition to the theoretical component, the course provides some practical nonviolent skills, including sessions on nonviolent communication and other active learning exercises exploring the challenges of practicing nonviolence in conflict situations.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to the Ph.D. program.
    • Credits: 1-0-1
  • INCM 9605 - College and University Teaching

    • This course introduces students to effective pedagogical skills and is designed to prepare future faculty for teaching careers. Topics include understanding how students learn, creating active learning environments, using formative and summative assessments, grading, handling problemation student behavior, responding to student diversity, designing courses and syllabi, and creating teaching philosophies.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to the Ph.D. program.
    • Credits: 1-0-1
  • INCM 9606 - Security System Reform (SSR)

    • The success of post-conflict peace-building depends heavily upon reform of the security system (SSR), which includes security and civilian actors. This course addresses the fundamental issues in SSR, its effects, and its problems and covers a variety of topics ranging from the security system, the security-development nexus and effects of deficiencies of the security sector on underdevelopment and violence, principles and conceptual reference points in SSR, aspects of political implementation in SSR, and international donors.
    • Prerequisites: INCM 9001 or INCM 9002.
    • Credits: 1-0-1
  • INCM 9607 - Strategy Development

    • This course examines the central concepts of strategy, strategy development and formulation, and their potential applications in the field of International Conflict Management. The course explores the process of strategy development and especially the construction of a strategic plan, and then applies that process to cases of particular interest to students.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to the Ph.D. program.
    • Credits: 1-0-1
  • INCM 9608 - Elections & Electoral Systems Design

    • In this course students will be exposed to the variety of electoral systems, the process of electoral system design and the main statistical tools for evaluating the impact of electoral system design on society. The coursework will involve readings, seminar discussion, and lab assignments. Discussions will take place both in-class and online to maximize participation. Students will be prepared to participate in design, monitoring and evaluation of electoral processes.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to the Ph.D. Program.
    • Credits: 1-0-1
  • INCM 9609 - Disarmament, Demobilization and Reintegration

    • Most violent conflicts in the late 20th and early 21st century have been characterized by the participation of large numbers of regular, irregular and semi-regular troops. The termination of these conflicts 'often in the form of a Comprehensive Peace Agreement' usually includes some provision for downsizing the armed forces of the participating sides, as it is recognized that the large numbers and low quality of these troops are often at the root of instability and potential future violence. To counter this, official or semi-official Disarmament, Demobilization, and Reintegration (DD&R) programs have been run by national and international bodies.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to the Ph.D. Program.
    • Credits: 1-0-1
  • INCM 9610 - Culture, Ethics, & Leadership in International Conflict Management

    • This course will focus on the interrelated aspects of culture, ethics, and leadership in international conflict management. Culture generally refers to the learned beliefs, values, rules, symbols, and traditions common to a group of people, the shared qualities that make them distinct. Ethics, on the other hand, is universal, based on a usually inborn empathy and sense of fairness, and is concerned with enabling individuals to flourish, to fully realize their capabilities. Leadership in this context refers to practices of managing conflict in some mutually advantageous (“win-win”) way and doing this in an exemplary way, modeling a way that two different groups can each flourish as a result of trusted leadership.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to the Ph.D. program.
    • Credits: 1-0-1
  • INCM 9611 - ICM Grant Writing and Evaluation

    • This course will focus on the research and writing skills needed to discover funding opportunities and prepare competitive proposals for them. Students will apply these techniques by developing a proposal that responds to an actual call for applications. Students will write a narrative portion that is ready for submission with a detailed outline of all other pieces that will be required, plus an implementation timetable to meet the sponsor's deadline. Depending on the deadline and the level of approval required from the University, the proposal may be submitted upon completion of the class with permission of the instructor.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to the Ph.D. program.
    • Credits: 1-0-1
  • INCM 9613 - Gaming, Conflict, and Decision-making

    • In this course students learn about decision-making games and how they can be used as tools for understanding, and managing, conflict. Reviewing the history of games used for conflict management and national security, this course examines how games shaped policy decisions about conflict and explores the theory of games and game design. Students participate in an international conflict management game and work on ideas for developing their own games.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to the Ph.D. program or permission of the program director.
    • Credits: 1-0-1
  • INCM 9650 - Special Topics in INCM

    • Special topics cover emerging issues or specialized skills related to international conflict management not represented in the main curriculum.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to the Ph.D. program or approval by program director and instructor
    • Credits: 1-3 Credit Hours
  • INCM 9700 - International Experience

    • This course serves as a way to apply the theories and skills learned throughout the program and to gain valuable field experience in a “real world” laboratory. This requirement may be completed through an internship, directed study, study abroad, or a relevant previous experience in an international setting and may range from 3 to 9 credit hours, depending on the nature of the experience.
    • Prerequisites: Approval of the INCM International Experience Coordinator.
    • Credits: 3-9, variable Credit Hours
  • INCM 9900 - Ph.D. Dissertation Research

    • This course includes dissertation writing under the direction of the major professor (dissertation advisor). The course is taught using a non-traditional format of independent research and preparation of the doctoral dissertation.
    • Prerequisites: Ph.D. candidacy
    • Credits: 1-9 (repeatable) Credit Hours

Conflict Management (MSCM)

  • MSCM 7100 - Introduction to Conflict Management

    • This course presents an overview of the emerging movement toward alternative forms of conflict resolution and of conflict management as an interdisciplinary field. Readings are drawn from a broad range of academic disciplines, including law, economics, social psychology, sociology, anthropology, political science, as well as dispute resolution. Students are introduced to conflict resolution theories, dispute resolution processes, conflict management system design, and application of conflict management to the public policy environment.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to graduate study.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • MSCM 7205 - Basic Mediation Training Clinic

    • This course is designed to provide students with basic mediation training approved by the Georgia Office of Dispute Resolution for mediators handling court-referred or court-ordered cases.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to MSCM graduate program or permission of program director.
    • Credits: 2-0-2
  • MSCM 7210 - Foundations and Theories of Conflict Management: Conflict Theory

    • This course is designed to introduce students to the foundations and theories of conflict management. The course includes an interdisciplinary introduction to conflict management. The course includes an interdisciplinary introduction to conflict, the history of the field, sources of conflict, and conflict theory. The course introduces students to the various responses to conflict.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to MSCM graduate program or permission of program director in consultation with faculty.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • MSCM 7220 - Foundations and Theories of Conflict Management: Negotiation Theory

    • Students will gain an understanding of the fundamentals of negotiation theory through a format that includes lecture, role-play, focused exercises, and case study. Concepts covered will include an introduction to game theory, distributive and integrative bargaining, principled negotiation, psychological barriers to settlement, and negotiation ethics.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to the MSCM program or permission of the program director in consultation with faculty.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • MSCM 7230 - Foundations and Theories of Conflict Management: ADR Continuum

    • This course helps students develop an understanding of the nomenclature of alternative dispute resolution (ADR) processes commonly used in the United States. The students will examine the history and evolution of ADR, as well as briefly examining a number of individual processes in detail, such as negotiation, mediation, arbitration, early neutral evaluation, ombuds offices, etc.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to MSCM graduate program or permission of program director in consultation with faculty.
    • Credits: 1-0-1
  • MSCM 7310 - Critical Knowledge and Skills of Conflict Management: Interpersonal, Intergroup, and Community Conflict and Workplace/Organizational Conflict

    • This course examines the dynamics of interpersonal and inter-group conflict, including emphases on the role of identity in conflict and the experience of conflict in employment contexts. Students witll learn the common sources, processes, and effects of conflict through readings, presentations, and exercises.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to the MSCM program and approval of the director in consultation with faculty, MSCM 7210, MsCM 7220, MSCM 7230.
    • Credits: 4-0-4
  • MSCM 7315 - Organizational and Workplace Conflict

    • This course examines the dynamics of organizational conflict with a special focus on the workplace context. Students will sharpen the skills and tools they learned in previous MSCM coursework and apply them to problems of intervention in organizational disputes.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to graduate study.
    • Credits: 1-0-1
  • MSCM 7320 - Critical Knowledge and Skills of Conflict Management: Public Policy Disputes, Cross-Cultural and International Conflict Resolution

    • This course examines public policy disputes and intercultural communication. Public policy disputes are unique in that they tend to be multi-party, multi-issue, long-standing, intractable, and they occur under the glare of public scrutiny. Therefore, managing public disputes requires greater ability to facilitate large-group processes and deal with the media. Next, the students will examine intercultural and international conflict resolution. The students will begin by developing an understanding of the ways in which cultures vary in their communication styles. Then students will examine the processes of international conflict resolution through diplomatic negotiation and mediation. Theories analyzing the strategic, structural, and behavioral features of international negotiations and mediations are discussed in lectures and case studies. Simulation exercises will be integrated to this class to provide students with hands-on experiences in applying theories to cases.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to MSCM graduate program or permission of program director in consultation with faculty, MSCM 7210, MSCM 7220, MSCM 7230, MSCM 7310.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • MSCM 7325 - Advanced Civil Mediation Clinic

    • Students will enhance their mediation skills and deepen their knowledge through observing mediation role-plays and videos. This course substitutes for 5 mediation observations, a requirement for registration with the Georgia Office of Dispute Resolution (GODR).
    • Prerequisites: MSCM 7205
    • Credits: 1-0-1
  • MSCM 7335 - Organizational Leadership

    • The class will focus on the key skills needed for superior organizational leadership. Class will review the literature on leadership and conflict management, dynamic organizational leaders, and analysis of scenarios.
    • Prerequisites:
    • Credits: 1-0-1
  • MSCM 7355 - Advanced International Mediation Clinic

    • This clinic will examine the applicability of mediation to a range of international disputes, with emphases on the coordination and timing of mediation efforts, and the complexity of the international arena. Students will review standards of practice from international organizations related to diplomacy and commerce, and apply these to selected cases.
    • Prerequisites:
    • Credits: 1-0-1
  • MSCM 7365 - Humanitarian Crisis Intervention

    • This is a two-day training course designed to explore a range of dilemmas and scenarios in humanitarian, peacebuilding, conflict and human rights crises. The course is built around using simulations.
    • Prerequisites:
    • Credits: 1-0-1
  • MSCM 7400 - Conflict Management Research Methods

    • This course is designed to introduce students to basic research methods used in the study of conflict. There is a particular emphasis upon methods to assess conflict and evaluation interventions designed to address conflict in a given environment.
    • Prerequisites: MSCM 7100; MSCM 7300
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • MSCM 7500 - Conflict Management Systems Design

    • This course will prepare students to design a system to address conflict in the environment of an organization.
    • Prerequisites: MSCM 7100; MSCM 7300; MSCM 7400
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • MSCM 7600 - Study of a Specific Conflict Management Environment

    • In this course the student chooses a specific environment for application of the knowledge and skills acquired through the academic and clinical components of the program. The study of a specific conflict environment provides the context for the student's fieldwork in the final semester of the MSCM program.
    • Prerequisites: MSCM 7100; MSCM 7300; MSCM 7400; MSCM 7500
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • MSCM 7705 - Advanced Applied Skills Training

    • This 42-hour advanced skills training course will enhance student’s theoretical, research, and practice skills. The course will be focused on the implementation of certain forms of practice, realms of practice, and the skills sets needed by the practitioner in each specific conflict management environment. Emphasis will be on the honing of skills for the student’s particular area of interest.
    • Prerequisites: MSCM 7205
    • Credits: 2-0-2
  • MSCM 7710 - The Practice of Conflict Management: Field Experience

    • This course includes a fieldwork, study, and travel to a specific domestic conflict environment chosen by the student with the guidance of the faculty. The students will research the background and history of the conflict and prepare a written report of this fieldwork upon returning. This course usually involves several students and faculty working and traveling together.
    • Prerequisites: 27 hours in graduate CM courses and approval of the program director in consultation with faculty.
    • Credits: 2-0-2
  • MSCM 7715 - The Practice of Conflict Management: Field Experience

    • This course includes a fieldwork, study, and travel to a specific international conflict environment. The students will research the background and history of the conflict and prepare a written report of this fieldwork upon returning. This course usually involves several students and faculty working and traveling together.
    • Prerequisites: 27 hours in graduate CM courses and approval of the program director in consultation with faculty.
    • Credits: 2-0-2
  • MSCM 7720 - The Practice of Conflict Management: Field Study and Internship Reports

    • This course includes a field study in a specific conflict environment chosen by the student with the guidance of the faculty. The students will analyze conflict in the chosen environment and, where appropriate, will make policy recommendations or design and plan implementation of the intervention processes to address the conflict. The students will prepare an extensive written report of this analysis, accompanied by an annotated bibliography.
    • Prerequisites: 27 hours in graduate CM courses and approval of the program director in consultation with faculty.
    • Credits: 5-0-5
  • MSCM 8900 - Special Topics

    • Exploration of a specified topic in conflict management.
    • Prerequisites: Admission to graduate study or permission of director of MSCM.
    • Credits: 1-3 Credit Hours
  • MSCM 8940 - Directed Study

    • Admission to this course requires permission of the Program Director and faculty member. A directed study is a special, one-time offering of a topic for a specific student. The directed study does not substantially overlap with an existing course in the curriculum. Directed study proposals are a concentrated investigation of a selected topic, is a well-defined proposal, is of an advanced nature, and have detailed learning objectives and deliverables. The specific content will be determined jointly by the instructor and student.
    • Prerequisites: None
    • Credits: 1-3 Credit Hours